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British Psychological Society endorses stigmatisation of ADHD

D: Second Update to Original Post (see A, B & C below)

Thursday, 7th June, We’ve just learnt that it looks as if the Power Threat Meaning Framework has been adopted as policy by the Division of Clinical Psychologists at the British Psychological Society. An email has been received by other psychologists which says “Statements of Interest are invited to join the DCP Power Threat Meaning Framework (PTM) Working Group, that reports directly to the DCP Committee.”

We have been working hard on our report about the PTMFramework and are now compiling the results into a coherent whole so that it can be presented along with our letter of complaint.  This has not been easy and has taken a while as the Framework itself is a poorly researched and poorly written mishmash of outdated ideas as well as being unintelligible in sections.

C: Second Update to Original Post (see A & B below)

As of today, Monday, 30th April, we’ve still not had any kind of a reply from the British Psychological Society regarding their stigmatising and discriminatory attitude towards people with ADHD.  We sent the BPS & authors of the Power Threat Meaning Framework a note today, via Twitter, to say that unless they promise by Friday, 4th May, in writing, that ADHD will be deleted from the PTMFramework we will be taking further action.

FYI, work on this further action is well underway!

In the meantime, we note that Lucy Johnstone, a consultant clinical psychologist and one of the two lead authors of the framework, tweeted at 5:10 pm on Tuesday, 24th April the following:

Capture

As you see, Lucy Johnstone declares that all diagnoses lack validity even if people actually find them to be helpful.  And she says, psychologists should be honest and tell us that our diagnoses are invalid.  That is an arrogant and harmful statement that devalues the experience of service users.

And before any of the authors think about contacting us to claim that the PTMframework is an alternative option to the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), we will state right here and now that we are not fooled! At the same time they tell everyone that their framework is an alternative option,  they also deny the validity of the DSM.  No options allowed!

Basically, in the PTMframework the authors claim that the symptoms we experience (ADHD included) are expressions of emotional distress caused by “relational and social adversities” such as poverty, discrimination, inequality, violence and abuse. Furthermore, they state that there are no ” consistent associations between functional psychiatric diagnoses [e.g. ADHD] and any biological pathology or impairment, and nor have any biomarkers been identified” (Johnstone, 2018, 7). In short, the authors dismiss the results of genetic and screening research. The framework is not backed by reliable research and the authors lack the depth of knowledge and experience of the DSM authors.

While the framework may be helpful for those people whose distress has been solely caused by relational and societal adversities (although they will still need the utility of the DSM), it will not help those whose distress results from the impact of complex interactions between genetic and environmental influences amplified by relational and societal adversities.  In fact, in these instances the framework will only serve to disempower people by denying the validity of their experiences.  It will increase feelings of failure and despair.

Unlike the PTMFramework, the DSM  is designed as a classification system that provides cross-border mental health professionals with a common diagnostic language that is useful for both treatment and research efforts.  While some of the DSM authors recognise that it is a flawed system, in part because knowledge about mental ill health is evolving and changing, they also acknowledge that the DSM contains much practical information and experience and is better than anything else currently available (and when used properly does a good job).

The two main criticisms levelled against the DSM (and psychiatry in general) are first, that it medicalises normal behaviours and turns them into illnesses and disorders to be treated with drugs and secondly, that the DSM’s authors (and psychiatrists in general) have conflicts of interest because they have links with the pharmaceutical industry.

The critics, including the authors, using these arguments conveniently overlook the fact that researchers from both the medical field and the pharmaceutical industry need to work together in order to find and develop effective treatments. They overlook the fact that in the UK the pharmaceutical industry is heavily regulated. Additionally, as we’ve noticed with the BPS and some of their members, many of these same critics fail to declare their own financial and personal interests.

Please don’t misunderstand us.  We’re not against debating the meaning and definition of illness and disorder, we’re not against improving the validity of  specific diagnoses, we’re not even against changes to the classification system; so long as changes are in line with improvements in knowledge about causes of and experiences with mental ill health.

We are, however, against mental health professionals working outside their area of expertise and not declaring their lack of knowledge.  We are also against the same professionals resorting to misinterpreting the conclusions of more knowledgeable colleagues and making attention-grabbing and unfounded pronouncements such as the ones they make about psychiatrists and psychiatric diagnoses.  The authors allege that psychiatric diagnoses are neither descriptively accurate nor evidence-based and cannot be considered “professionally, scientifically or ethically justifiable” (Johnstone, 2018, p. 314). We are against mental health professionals attempting to enhance their own professional reputation by using these sorts of  tactics to discredit the work of other colleagues.

Additionally, we think it is unethical and unprofessional, to say nothing of being harmful, for the authors of the PTMFramework to justify their own work by perpetuating distrust of psychiatry amongst people with negative experiences and by undermining the trust of those who’ve had helpful experiences.

Finally, we will point out to all those mental health professionals who feel disturbed by the implications of the PTMFramework but are staying silent, thereby implying acceptance, the framework authors’ failure to recognise their own limits, biases, prejudices, professional and power interests will not only cause harm to many service users, it will also damage the reputation of psychology as a helpful profession. And those of you who do not speak up will be seen as complicit.

There will be more on these as well as additional points later!

B: First Update to Original Post (see A: below):

As of today, Tuesday, 27th March 2018 we’ve had no reply whatsoever from the British Psychological Society.  Never mind; we’ve been working hard on a comprehensive follow-up which we will send to certain parties as well as publish here.

In the meantime, we note that on 1st March 2018 Lyn Romeo, Chief Social Worker for Adults, at the Department of Health not only introduced the Power Threat Meaning Framework as a radically different perspective on mental health on her official government blog but also allowed Phil Wilshire, principal social worker for Avon and Wiltshire NHS Partnership Trust to write a guest blog promoting the framework.

Phil does acknowledge that some professionals and some service users have been critical of the framework so he tries to argue that the framework is an “optional conceptual resource” and that it is not anti-medication. His efforts, however, are deliberately misleading given that in the first paragraph on page 314 of the framework the authors clearly state that while they affirm “people’s right to describe their difficulties as they wish, we affirm the equally important principle that professionals, researchers, trainers, lecturers, charities, policy-makers and others involved in the mental health field should use language and concepts that have some claim to be descriptively accurate and evidence-based. Because psychiatric diagnosis does not meet these standards, it follows that it can no longer be considered professionally, scientifically or ethically justifiable to present psychiatric diagnoses as if they were valid statements about people and their difficulties.” You see; they are actually trying to take away our right to accept our ADHD diagnoses by calling them unprofessional, unscientific and unethical. What’s more they haven’t provided any valid evidence at all for this opinion.

By the way; Phil Wilshire probably should have declared his interest in the Framework as he’s listed on page 3 as having “significant input into Chapter 8” which is titled “Ways forward” and contains the following sections: 1. Public health policy. 2. Mental health policy. 3. Service principles. 4. Service design, commissioning and outcomes. 5. Access to social care, housing and welfare benefits. 6. Therapeutic interventions. 7. The legal system. 8. Research. 9. Use of language.

Mr Wilshire, of course, is advocating an eventual “collective shift towards a non-diagnostic paradigm.” (p. 264)  Well . . . . good luck!!

And just in case Phil and Lyn have been chatting about how to implement the Framework, we suggest that since they both work for public bodies, they might like to ask themselves how their support for the framework complies with their public sector equality duty under the Equality Act 2010. And if they’ve overlooked their legal obligations, here’s a reminder: “those subject to the equality duty must, in the exercise of their functions, have due regard to the need to: Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other conduct prohibited by the Act. . . etc.“!!!

A: Original Post (rev. edn. published 26th January 2018):

On Tuesday, 16th January, AADD-UK was alerted to a furious Twitter row that began Friday, 12th January when the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP), a Division within the British Psychological Society (BPS),*  held an actively promoted launch at the Friends House, across from Euston Station, London for the Division’s recently published “Power Threat Meaning Framework: Towards the identification of patterns in emotional distress, unusual experiences and troubled or troubling behaviour, as an alternative to functional psychiatric diagnosis.” 

Having no idea what this Framework was about & curious as to why there was such a ruckus, I downloaded a copy and began reading.

This is what happened:

The Framework seemed sturdy, 411 pages long, and reputable.   It’s on the BPS website, it has their logo (Tagline: Promoting excellence in psychology) as well as the logo for the Division of Clinical Psychologists. It’s clearly stated on the printer’s imprint and copyright page that the publication “has been produced by the British Psychological Society’s Division of Clinical Psychology as a Member Network publication and represents the views and expert contributions of its authors” and it was printed and published by the British Psychological Society.

So far so good.

Next, on page 5, under the heading ‘Document summary‘, I learnt the reason for the existence of the Framework as follows (please bear with me as I give you these somewhat tedious details, their relevance will be more evident later):

In 2013, the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP) of the British Psychological Society
(BPS) published a Position Statement entitled “Classification of behaviour and experience in relation to functional psychiatric diagnoses: Time for a paradigm shift.” Recommendation 3 of the position paper is: ‘To support work, in conjunction with service users, on developing a multi-factorial and contextual approach, which incorporates social, psychological and biological factors’ (p.9). This document is the result of a DCP-funded project for work towards fulfilling this aim.

Since I tend to be overly conscientious as well as curious, I decided to read ‘Time for a paradigm shift‘ first so that I could understand the context for the PTMFramework so I downloaded a copy, thankfully only 9 pages long, and began reading (it’s publication format was the same as the Framework’s).

I was more interested when I recognised a few of the author’s names due to their interactions with the Twitter row. Things quickly became more interesting when, on page 2, I read the following paragraph (emphasis mine):

At the same time it should be noted that functional psychiatric diagnoses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorders and so on, due to their limited reliability and questionable validity, provide a flawed basis for evidence-based practice, research, intervention guidelines and the various administrative and nonclinical uses of diagnosis.

After this, I carried on reading, paying closer attention to the references and source names, some of whom I also recognised, and by the time I reached the summary (below) on page 5, I’d already concluded that the ‘position statement‘ produced by the Division of Clinical Psychologists was a veiled attempt at undermining psychiatry and diagnoses, i.e. anti-psychiatry. The Twitter row wasn’t the only place I’d seen those names.

The DCP believes there is a clear rationale and need for a paradigm shift in relation to functional psychiatric diagnoses. It argues for an approach that is multi-factorial, contextualises distress and behaviour, and acknowledges the complexity of the interactions involved in all human experience.

The whole Division? I wondered how many psychologists were involved so I did a Google search.  I didn’t find numbers for psychologists but I did find an interesting page on the BPS website under “news”. It’s titled  “The future of clinical psychology in the Society” which mentions plans for a another UK association for Clinical Psychologists.  Intriguingly, there’s strange hints about unity (lack of?) along with a reminder that relationships with external organisations must advance BPS’ objects.  The policy is linked to this page.  Hmm! Keep all this in mind as you read on.

I returned to reading the Power Threat Meaning Framework.  Now, I freely admit that I was slightly distracted by the policy I’d just read and I was aware my bias filters were turned on.  I thought I knew what to expect.  I was wrong!

I was shocked! And this feeling intensified the more I read.  The authors’ tone, conveyed through their choice of words and viewpoint, is arrogant and patronising and their negative and disapproving attitude towards ADHD is stigmatising and discriminatory.  Make no mistake the ideology behind the Framework belongs to the anti-psychiatry movement.

I’m not going to analyse the arguments put forward in the Framework other than to say that while some of the ideas are  interesting, they aren’t discussed in any depth. The authors’ make some half-hearted attempts at describing different sides of an argument, but these are often spoilt by their habit of using adverbs to manipulate us into choosing their favoured option .

This post is getting too long so I’m only going to add 5 extracts from the Framework so that you have some sort of idea as to what it’s like.  I’ve put links to the Framework as well as to the Time for a Paradigm Shift at the very end of this post in the References section.  If you’re interested, you can download them and judge them for yourselves.

“. . .and psychiatric diagnoses are often explicitly used as explanations. But the impression of explanation is false and the reasoning behind it is illogical“. (2018, p.29)

We underestimate the difficulty of describing patterns in people’s behavioural or bodily problems and often ‘see’ associations which are not there (known as the illusory correlation). This is why medical researchers have developed the kind of rules we discussed earlier to try to ensure that the bodily patterns they describe are ‘real’ and not illusory. The combination of limited public understanding of diagnostic procedures and overconfidence in judgements of patterns, can confer credibility on psychiatric categories which is not justified by the evidence“. 2018, p.30)

The existence of particular categories can influence how people’s experiences are interpreted and how they express their distress. Aided by the illusory correlation, diagnostic categories can then become self-fulfilling prophecies, conferring further credibility as growing numbers of people seem to match them. And, especially if people do not have access to non-medical, non-blaming explanations, the process can become self-perpetuating as people increasingly request confirmation of self-diagnoses of ‘bipolar disorder’ or ‘ADHD’ and so on.” (2018, p.30)

All of this is reflected in psychiatric diagnosis’ inevitable dependence on social judgements, as we discussed in Chapter 1, and many critics have traced particular diagnoses back to the social norms they challenge: ‘borderline personality disorder’ for women who are too angry; ‘depression’ for women who are exhausted by domestic demands; ‘anorexia nervosa’ as a reaction to the unrealistic role and appearance standards faced by modern women; alcohol misuse and suicide for men whose socialisation does not permit the expression of despair in other ways; ‘ADHD’ for children who are not suited to educational regimentation, and so on . . .These rule transgressions can involve over-adaption to the ideal image, as well as failing to live up to it; . . . Similarly, it has been suggested that the enormous rise in diagnoses of ‘autism spectrum disorders’ and ‘Asperger’s’ may partly reflect demands made by highly industrialised and service-oriented economies for successful employees to display emotional behaviours such as (faked) sociability, warmth, gratitude, passion and so on – skills which do not come easily to everyone (Roberts, 2015). (NB: Although autism in its most severe forms fits the profile of a neurodevelopmental disorder of some kind, the debates about these diagnoses are particularly complex . .  . Given all this, it is hardly surprising that in many parts of the Global South, there may be no equivalent categories to the experiences that DSM and ICD label as ‘depression’, ‘anxiety’, borderline personality disorder, anorexia, and so on. In fact, the distinction between thought and emotion may not even be recognised (Cromby, 2015) and the very notion of an individual who exists in some sense independently from their social network may be alien.” (2018, p. 69-70)

From a PTM Framework perspective, the trauma-informed model has much to offer. It also has risks and limitations, including: Conceptualising the approach as an alternative explanation for ‘schizophrenia’, ‘bipolar disorder’, ‘ADHD’ and so on, perhaps by reducing adversities to the status of a ‘trigger’ and thus retaining diagnostic categories and thinking . . .”  (2018, p.276)

I apologise for the length of the quotes. I’m trying to give you an accurate picture by including some context.

Returning to my story: I revisited the Twitter row, partly because I was angry and looking for a fight and partly because I couldn’t believe that professionals still believed this kind of stuff in 2018.

I’m going to pause now and give myself a pat on the back, as once advised by a psychotherapist.

Despite being angry and upset, I managed to stay calm and polite, except for a couple of little jabs & swipes, as I asked questions and gave feedback to the authors, and yes the medication also helped even when my questions were evaded and ignored. I did, however, get replies from a registered psychologist, supporter of the Framework, who told me, via tweets, that ADHD diagnoses are invalid and damaging. I also saw a tweet from one of the Framework authors in which she stated, “IMO all DX are BS & giving psychoactive meds to kids is immoral. To view ADHD as valid DX seems remarkably lacking in critical thinking.” I’ve kept copies of these tweets.

Eventually, I realised I was wasting my time and energy, the authors didn’t want to hear, even questioned whether I’d read the framework,  and then said it was up to me how I used the Framework, I didn’t give the obvious reply!   Instead I decided to leave.

I was sorry though to leave behind some of the people I’d met (I’m using the word figuratively) .   Not all psychologists support the framework, and the same goes for my fellow service users.  In fact the people I met were kind, caring and open-minded, and some even had a wicked sense of humour and mischief.  I laughed out loud several times.

I also met service users from the other side of the argument who were kind and helped me to understand and accept their very valid reasons for disliking diagnoses.  But my experiences with the professional supporters of the Framework had a completely different nature.  I’m not going to give details, it’s not fair.  And anyway, we’ve reached the point at which I return to the description I gave earlier of the publication details of the DCP’s position statement and the PTMFramework. My reasons for giving you those dull details at the beginning.

You see, I couldn’t just walk away telling myself that the fuss would die down in a few days and be forgotten. The reality is that the BPS allowed the PTMFramework, despite its evident bias and stigmatising attitude, to be published and available on their website.  Registered clinical psychologists promoted it on Twitter, and the BPS and DPC logos are displayed on its front cover.  And all this means the PTMFramework carries a backstory of reputability, reliability, and safety.  This apparent endorsement by the BPS will encourage the stigmatisation of people with ADHD.

That’s why, here at AADD-UK,  we talked and made a plan the first step of which was to send an open letter (below) to the British Psychological Society in which we set out our requests.  If these are met we will consider the matter closed as far as we are concerned.

We sent our letter, via Twitter, to BPS on Tuesday, 23rd January but to date we’ve not had a reply.

Never mind, the longer the delay, the longer the length of rope.

We will wait until end of day on Friday, 2 February for a reply.

Transcript of letter sent to BPS as a warning shot across their bows:

Tuesday, 23rd January 2018

Open letter to the British Psychological Society 

Re: The Power Threat Meaning Framework (PTMFramework) *

We are a service user organisation and via public promotion on Twitter by the authors and their supporters we were alerted to the open availability of the PTMFramework.

We read it and were shocked by the strong, stigmatising suggestion that ADHD is an illusory, unprofessional, unscientific and unethical diagnosis.

We joined the public Twitter debate & gave this feedback to the lead author as well to @BPSOfficial and @UKDCP. We also pointed out that our views were not sought before publication. We asked for your response.

None has been forthcoming regarding our feedback about these two matters although a registered psychologist, supporter of the framework, did send us inappropriate tweets.

As this has taken place on Twitter, we are using the same platform to ask that the current version of the PTMFramework be retracted to allow the removal of all specific references to ADHD as well as all assertions and/or suggestions that ADHD is an invalid diagnosis.

We also respectfully suggest that the Framework be amended to meet academic standards.

Finally, we ask that you issue a public apology acknowledging the distress and stigmatisation that ADHD service users are experiencing due to the open-access publication and ongoing public promotion of the current version. We suggest that you also respond regarding the unprofessional tweets from the registered psychologist.

If these requests are met, we will consider these specific matters closed as far as we are concerned.

Kind regards,

Susan Dunn Morua on behalf of AADD-UK
@AADDUK (other contact details supplied upon request)

Notes:

1.Many psychologists are NOT supportive of this framework. Additionally, there are service users who reject their diagnosis, for valid reasons, and thus support the framework. AADD-UK fully understands, accepts and supports their right to make this choice. Our letter is only addressing the stigmatising attitude displayed towards ADHD people who have benefited from a psychiatric diagnosis

2. The British Psychological Society is a registered charity which according the blurb on their website does the following:

“. . . acts as the representative body for psychology and psychologists in the UK, and is responsible for the promotion of excellence and ethical practice in the science, education, and application of the discipline.”

And:

As a society we support and enhance the development and application of psychology for the greater public good, setting high standards for research, education, and knowledge, and disseminating our knowledge to increase the wider public awareness of psychology and its importance.”

References:

Awenat, F. & Berger, M., Coles, S., et al. (2013). Classification of behaviour and experience in relation to functional psychiatric diagnoses: Time for a paradigm shift. DCP Position Statement. Leicester: British Psychological  Society

*Johnstone, L. & Boyle, M. with Cromby, J., Dillon, J., Harper, D., Kinderman, P., Longden, E., Pilgrim, D. & Read, J. (2018). The Power Threat Meaning Framework: Towards the identification of patterns in emotional distress, unusual experiences and troubled or troubling behaviour, as an alternative to functional psychiatric diagnosis. Leicester: British Psychological Society

Standards of Conduct, Performance and ethics for registered psychologists

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Please Help Map Adult ADHD Services

The Children and Adolescents with ADHD in Transition between Children’s Services and adult Services (CATCh-uS) project team at the University of Exeter ran a survey in 2016 with the aim of creating a map of existing NHS adult ADHD services in the UK.

Responses to the 2016 survey have been used to create a preliminary map of existing NHS, voluntary and private services for adults with ADHD. This map not only helps inform and improve services for young people transitioning from child and adolescent mental health services to adult mental health services, it also helps adults who need to access ADHD services.  Importantly, the map also highlights areas in the UK where there are gaps in service provision.

This map was created, however, from information gathered in 2016 and now needs to be updated.  The CATCh-uS team, therefore, are asking people with ADHD, as well as anybody who knows someone with ADHD, or anybody who works with people with ADHD to take part in a new mapping survey.

Here is the live 2018 mapping survey. Please do take part!

It shouldn’t take longer than 5 minutes to complete, it is anonymous and confidential, personal information will not be shared, but most importantly your answers will help update the map of ADHD services.

Background 

CATCh-uS is a very important research study of young people with ADHD in transition from children’s services to adult services. It aims to establish how many young people with ADHD are in need of services for ADHD as adults, and investigate young peoples, parents and practitioners views about the transition process. It is also mapping currently available adult ADHD services around the country. It is funded by the National Institute of Health Research and has been approved by NRES South Yorkshire Ethics Committee – Yorkshire & The Humber (REC Reference: 15/YH/0426) and the University of Exeter Medical School Ethics Committee (REC Application Number: 15/07/070). This study has been adopted by the new HRA on 15th June 2016 (“HRA Approval for a study with an existing UK study wide review”). More details are available on the CATCh-uS website.

How To Deal With Those Tiresome “ADHD” Malingerers by Dr Ivor Schweinekopf

[Editor’s note:  Please be aware that this is satire so should not be read by anyone without a sense of humour. And probably not doctors of the old-fashioned sort. Despite this being humorous, all the excuses and maltreatment are  based on real situations we have been made aware of, mostly on multiple occasions. Now read on…]

 

We’ve all had them in our surgeries.

“Oo Doctor, I think I may have ADHD. I’ve got all the symptoms” they whine, as if they know anything about themselves, their minds or medicine. You’ve probably rolled your eyes reading this and nodded in recognition and thought “If only there was a way to get rid of these timewasters!” Or Attention-seeking Dithering Hypochondriac Dolts, I call them.

Well, I’m here to tell you that there is a way. In fact several ways. Let’s have a look at some of them.

A) Ignore them. Yes, you read correctly, ignore them. Change the subject, ask a diverting question, bring up a topic spoken of earlier, or bring up another topic you hadn’t yet got to but had down to mention. Or even better, just come up with something new to worry them. You know what these idiots are like. Change the subject or give them something else to think about and you know they’ll forget what they were talking about until long after you’ve ushered them out of the surgery. Small note here – as you shove them out, point out that there are more patients waiting and you have to be fair to them. Remind your ADHDolt that you are very important and your time is precious, but they aren’t and their time isn’t.

Now you may worry that this tactic might be seen as wilful negligence, but remember that these blithering buffoons probably won’t remember and also really lack legal credibility.  Who is going to believe a wittering serial user of mental health services compared to an upright member of the medical profession? No one, that’s who.

B) Deny, deny, deny. Okay, so you’ve got an ADHDolt that actually managed to stay on topic for more than two sentences, what do you do? This is actually more than one tactic, it is several but using the same method. Let’s look at the sub topics: Deny there is such a thing as ADHD in adults. You are important, your ADHDolt is not. Whatever they have read or cited (or brought in in those annoying little print-outs they do), just tell them they are wrong, and the information is wrong. Tell of them the courses and exams you passed and the years of experience you’ve had, and that you can assure them there is no such thing. If you have the nerve, just bluntly tell them you read an article about it in a newspaper and it said there’d no such thing. Start with a paper such as The Times, but you’ll find, as your experience and confidence grows that you can work your way down to The Daily Mail and The Mirror and they’ll accept it. Tip: try not to even sound positive that it exists in children, let alone adults.

  1. Deny that the NHS treats adult ADHD.  Here’s a tip – try to blame it all on Americans. This is a great tactic as it sort of hints you are blaming it on “Big Pharma” without saying it specifically and endangering your relationship with the drug company rep. Also it sort of blames their system (the fact that the actual science is universal and properly conducted research applies the world over is something to avoid) and says how wonderful we (i.e. you are). Tell them that it isn’t really recognised and/or treated in the UK.
  2. Deny that your area treats ADHD in adults. If they keep whining, agree that some people over here think there might be ADHD in adults but serious people don’t. Of course, if other, slightly odd, people think there’s such a thing as adult ADHD that doesn’t affect your area where people are sensible and don’t believe in such nonsense and your ADHDolt should shut up and stop wasting your time! Tip: For heaven’s sake, don’t let slip you can refer them out of area. And another tip: even if you do have a service in area or a contract with another provider DON’T TELL THEM!
  3. Deny that they could possibly have it. Of course, officially only a qualified specialists can diagnose ADHD, so, by the same token, only they can (officially) say that someone doesn’t have it. But you are the gatekeeper to those specialists. Don’t open the gates. Tell them they couldn’t possibly have it because of some small success in their life, even if everything else is a disaster. “But you passed GCSE whatever / A level whatever / got into university / have a job / had a job / look smart / have got your shoes on the right way round”. Any and all of these will do.
  4. Deny all knowledge of anything. In other words, if all else fails, just plead ignorance. That’s it – just claim you don’t know anything about the subject or who or where to refer them. They’re all such a bunch of arses they’ll never work it out for themselves.

If you do have to admit something, only acknowledge their problem long enough to get rid of them, not long enough to make them feel supported, and certainly not long enough to start any treatment. You should say something like: “I feel your pain. I understand your problems. I acknowledge the difficulties you have. Now piss off.”

C) Use delaying tactics. Even if they do work out who or where to be referred (which is pretty hard for a regular patient, let alone one of these disorganised bozos)  – sometimes they’ve been along to one of these egregious “self-help groups” (which must be veritable buffoon-fests!”) or managed to print something off www.aadduk.org – a web site created and maintained by what one can only imagine is one of the world’s greatest slag heaps of tosspots and ne’er-do-wells – and they’ve actually got hold of the NICE guidelines and the name of somewhere/someone to be referred to (and, if out of area, a copy of the rules pointing out you are duty bound to refer there if there’s nothing suitable locally), delay!

Tell them you’ll think about it, or that you’ll look into it, to get them out of your office. Then do nothing. Most won’t remember. A good trick that has worked for a lot of people is to simply agree with them (yes, agree!). Tell them you’ll refer them. Then do nothing.

Here’s a great example of tactics I have to take my hat off to. A woman was worried about having ADHD and sought an assessment. Her children and husband all had (and still have) varying degrees and combinations of ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder. She was referred to the local service but didn’t hear anything for a while. Three times she followed it up and each time was told she’d hear something within two weeks. Needless to say, each deadline sailed by without her hearing a dickybird. She went to one of these loathsome busybodies that try and help and advocate for such people. The busybody complained and the practitioner was able to come back with not only a bunch of the usual excuses (someone’s on holiday etc etc) but also an absolute blinder. People being assessed for ADHD should chase up their own cases because… wait for it… it empowers them! Genius! Make it difficult for them, ignore them, sideline them and it is good for them! It’s part of the treatment! The sods should be grateful. Punch them in the face and then tell them they should thank you. Masterful use of delaying tactics there, followed up with an assertion so utterly outrageous it is almost impossible to counter. Full marks to whoever thought that one up.

Another brilliant delaying tactic is to find some other problem they’ve got and use that to avoid treating the ADHD. People who have had lifelong ADHD almost always have had anxiety and depression because of it. Just say that you have to treat the depression and anxiety first. Of course, if they go on bogging up their lives because of the ADHD they’ll go on feeling depressed and anxious, so you never have to treat the ADHD!

Quite a few have co-morbid Autism Spectrum Disorder. Get them on that. If any have mood swings or anger management problems, and they show them on front of you (or even a member of staff), you can bung them out on the spot for being abusive, and anyway you can put down “difficult patient” in their file’s private bit.You may even be able to get them banned from almost all the primary medical services in the whole area.

Or put them down as having a personality disorder (there are several, take you pick). A lot of areas don’t treat personality disorders so that finishes that, but even if your area does have such a service, and you actually think the patient does have a personality disorder, just treat them for that alone. Don’t make the mistake of admitting that it is possible to have ADHD and something else at the same time.

If you didn’t want to see people with mobility problems, you could agree to only see them in an office that is up three flights of stairs with no lift. Do the psychological equivalent to the ADHDolts. They just don’t have the gumption or organisation to stick at anything so just keep giving them hoops to jump through.

D) Divert. If denying or delaying doesn’t work, divert. Send them to the wrong type of therapy – in particular to a therapist that knows little of ADHD. This is widely practiced. One good example we know of was someone who had an assessment saying “Emma doesn’t have ADHD because she can concentrate sometimes.” [Editor’s note: if you don’t know why this is nonsense, then you really don’t understand ADHD. Name changed, BTW.]

Only a psychiatrist can diagnose ADHD so make sure to send patients to anything but a psychiatrist. Then, even if the person does realise the patient has ADHD, there is nothing they can do about it. That works so often, and even now never fails to make me laugh!

E) Discontinue. But, just suppose they’ve previously been treated by one of the increasing number of modern goody-goody doctors (who are letting the side down quite frankly). Suppose they actually are getting some treatment (thankfully probably only medication on a long-term basis) all is not lost. Get them off it!

There are all sorts of excuses, sorry, I mean reasons. Age is a good one. Almost every complaint treated is treated for the whole of the patient’s life, but sometimes they’ll believe the age thing with ADHD.

Keep doing blood tests. Liver ones are good, but do as many as you can. You might not take someone off statins at the first sign of liver problems, but do so with ADHD meds.

If any one of the possible side effects even if unlikely occur (and there’s a huge list on the leaflet with the medication – as with any medicine the leaflet has to list even the really unlikely and unproven ones), take them off. Now arguably you are supposed to refer them to an expert, but hey, just stop the prescription and let the ADHDolt argue. To see a specialist they have to go through you!

Depression and anxiety are great excuses. In one list of possible but unlikely side effects is “Behaving With Excessive Cheerfulness And Activity”! A happy productive member of society? We can’t have that. Get them off the stuff at once!

Oh, and any possible addiction or substance abuse even if you only have circumstantial evidence is a great excuse to get them off the meds. Now a lot of these whiners say they sometimes have trouble remembering to take their medication, which on the face of it looks rather the opposite of addiction. Have you ever heard an alky exclaim, “Damn, I forgot to drink vodka today!”? But remember, what you feel about the matter is a much better guide than what the patient reports.

F) And finally, if all else fails, remember to stigmatise them. The poor little darlings, because of their ‘life difficulties’ become sensitive to rejection. (Let’s be honest, if they didn’t keep claiming they had anything wrong with them, they wouldn’t keep getting rejected!) Be patronising. Ask them if they get a buzz off the meds. Tell them they are lucky to be seen at all, let alone diagnosed. Tell them how controversial the whole topic is, how expensive the drugs are, that they aren’t trying hard enough (especially on timekeeping – even if your surgery habitually runs late). After all, shame has been shown to work so well with topics such as addiction and obesity, and, let’s be honest, and the GUM clinics are a disgrace the way they go around treating people for diseases in a non-judgemental way. Let’s hope it doesn’t spread to the rest of the medical field or well end up letting these ADHDolts off the hook for their moral failings!

Goodbye and Don’t Forget To Grind The Bastards Down!

Ivor Schweinekopf

 

[Editor’s note: We would be delighted to hear your personal experience of trying to get assessed or treated for ADHD in the UK – we may be able to do a follow-up article. Please contact the (real) author: theunreadyaethelred@gmail.com

If you have or might have ADHD or otherwise been affected by this article please come to an ADHD support group or join our forum, and if you are having trouble getting treatment Here’s the relevant page on NICE, and here’s a summary of your rights and here are some more – try printing them out and taking them with you (sorry, currently in England, other regions to follow), and of course, please tell your story be it gruesome or funny – they’re often both – to Aethelred The Unready who is currently saddling his horse to sally forth against the ranking hordes of Schweinekopfs.]

We welcome your sharing this on social media and elsewhere, please give attribution to (the real) author and site.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/.

It was originally published here.

Creative Commons Licence

Bridging the gap: optimising transition from child to adult mental healthcare

The following has been taken from the introduction to an Expert Policy Paper that explores the reasons why transitioning from child to adult mental healthcare is problematic and challenging. We’ve put a link to the full paper at the end of the following introduction:

Transition to adult services is often a difficult time for young people living with a mental
health condition. The journey through adolescence into adulthood is a time of significant
physical, psychological and social change not only for the adolescent, but also their
families. Overall rates of mental health problems can also increase during adolescence and issues become more complex, and in some cases serious disorders such as psychosis
may emerge. During this period, adolescents may also have a greater tendency for risky
behaviour, become lost in the system between child and adult mental health services and are also at greater risk of disengagement from services.

This Expert Policy Paper was developed on the basis of an Expert Working Meeting on
Mental Health and Transition, held in Brussels on 11 July 2017. The meeting brought
together expert clinicians (psychiatrists and neurologists), patient representatives, academics and mental health advocacy groups to explore the reasons why transition of care is currently suboptimal, discuss and agree on the principles for good transition and develop practical recommendations for improving transition to adult mental healthcare services. The group included expert stakeholders from the field of transition of care, mental health in general and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

The Expert Working Group highlighted that the problems associated with transition from child to adult services are not disease-specific; they apply to all mental health disorders, for example, epilepsy, autism and social phobia. However, to identify practical policy solutions, the Expert Working Meeting focused on ADHD as a case study in the analysis of the problems, barriers to change and potential solutions associated with transition of care.

ADHD is a diverse condition characterised by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity
and impulsivity that can have a significant impact on patients’ lives. ADHD is relatively
common and often persists into adulthood. Despite this, access to adult ADHD services
and support is generally poor, resulting in frequent gaps in care.2,11 For these reasons,
ADHD provides an example in which to frame transition to adult services across the
mental health sector.

If you would like to read the full Policy Paper, please click on Bridging the Gap 

 

PROUD: Pilot study on prevention of low mood & weight problems in young adults with ADHD

Researchers for the study of Comorbid Conditions in ADHD (CoCA) at King’s College London are looking for adolescents and young adults aged between 14 to 30 years, who have a current diagnosis of ADHD and are on stable treatment for ADHD (i.e. medical or non-medical, or no active treatment at all), to take part in a new research study investigating the use of exercise and bright light therapy to improve low mood, weight problems and general health. Participation involves one of the following 10-week interventions as well as five visits to their research centre in south London for a number of physical and mental health assessments.

(1) Exercise programme – to evaluate the effects of exercise
(2) Bright light therapy – to evaluate the effects of bright light
(3) Treatment as usual – to provide a control group with no additional interventions.

Participant requirements:
1. Diagnosis of ADHD
2. Stable treatment as usual
3.Age 14-30 years old
4. No diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, or any other severe psychiatric disorder requiring inpatient treatment
5. No severe medical or neurological condition not allowing bright light therapy or physical exercise
6. No history of epilepsy

Travel arrangements:
They will help make the travel arrangements as convenient as possible and will reimburse all of your travel expenses. They will also provide a reimbursement of £200 for your time and effort, which will be paid in instalments for each of the five appointments attended.

Background Information:

This particular project is one part of a large international & collaborative ADHD research project (launched in April 2016) called “Comorbid Conditions of Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (CoCA)”. The aim of CoCA is to understand how and why ADHD often occurs alongside other physical and mental health problems, including anxiety, depression, substance use disorders and obesity. King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is one of 17 institutions across nine countries to receive funding for this project.

Through CoCA, the researchers hope to raise awareness of ADHD, reduce the stigma associated with ADHD, and empower prevention and therapy approaches as well as providing new tools to prevent ADHD from escalating into additional disorders.

How to get involved:

For further information as well as contact details please click on the following links:

1. PROUD information & consent form

2. PROUD recruitment

3. PROUD Letters of invitation – adults version

4. PROUD recruitment poster

5. News release (12/04/2016): Researchers launch international ADHD project

Clinical Guideline (CG72) ADHD: diagnosis & management Update

NICE Guidelines are recommendations for the treatment and care of people with ADHD by health professionals within the NHS. They are based on the best available research evidence and their aim is to improve the quality of healthcare. The guidelines are also used to develop standards to assess the clinical practice of ADHD clinics and services and are used in the education and training of health professionals. They also help us, people with ADHD, to make informed decisions and improve communication between us and the health professionals. When a guideline is developed, organisations can register as stakeholders (AADD-UK is a registered stakeholder) which means that they are consulted throughout the development process.

The original guidelines (on the diagnosis and management of ADHD) were published in September 2008 and are now being updated. The update covers the areas of identification of risk factors, post diagnostic advice, non-pharmacological and pharmacological management and intervention adherence for children, young people and adults with a diagnosis of ADHD. It does not cover any other aspect from the previous guideline.

The consultation period started on the 6th September 2017 and will end on 18th October 2017 at 5 pm. The updated guidelines are expected to be published on 21st February 2018.

NICE accepts comments during the consultation period from organisations that are registered as stakeholders but individuals can submit comments by contacting the stakeholder organisation that most closely represents their interests. AADD-UK is a stakeholder organisation and will be submitting comments so if you would like to add your suggestions or comments please feel free to send them to us by email at aadd.org@gmail.com. Here is a link to the NICE website with more information about the ADHD Guideline update.

ADHD: Surviving or Thriving?

Here at AADD-UK we avidly followed the news about mental health issues during Mental Health Awareness Week.  We admired the bravery of those telling their own stories, we retweeted some general mental health links instead of those that only dealt directly with ADHD, all the while preparing for our 10th Year Anniversary by revamping our website. Then suddenly we realised we’d forgotten the elephant in our own parlour! So we decided to write, just before the week ended, our own position for Mental Health Awareness Week.. Here it is:

First, we thanked the Mental Health Foundation for hosting the week, and thanked them for commissioning the survey and consequent report “Surviving or Thriving? The state of the UK’s mental health.” The authors of the report wrote that despite “many areas of advances in human health we are not seeing these reflected in mental health. If anything, the signs are that we are slipping back.” They backed this up by shockingly disclosing that only 13% of those surveyed in England, Scotland and Wales had “high positive mental health” and that nearly “two-thirds of people say that they have experienced a mental health problem” and others were clearly “just about surviving.”

The authors further reported that those of us living with either low household incomes or  unemployment have worse mental health than those employed at higher incomes. 3 in 4 people at the lowest income level, 85% of unemployed people, 7 in every 10 women, 7 in every 10 young adults (aged 18-34), and 7 in 10 people living alone experienced poor mental health. Additionally, the authors quoted the “Mental Health and Wellbeing in England: Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2014” (published last year) which revealed that every week 1 in 6 adults experienced a “common mental health problem, such as anxiety or depression. 1 in 5 adults reported that they had considered taking their own life at some point.”

I sat in silence and reflected upon those numbers and felt an overwhelming sadness. So much unnoticed desperation and despair! Swiftly followed by anger; “Who can I blame?” “Where shall I point my finger?” You see, all this correlated almost exactly with our own experiences in the ADHD world.

It’s been almost 10 years since we set up AADD-UK with hope and optimism. During that 10 years, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published ADHD Guidelines in which adults were included for the first time. Of course there was some initial resistance but over the years more and more professionals  became interested, more and more moved into the field, more and more research confirmed ADHD as valid (even the usual tabloid suspects now, tentatively,  report positive ADHD stories) and there are more ADHD services in the UK than the 3 that existed 10 years ago.

But all is not well! As awareness of ADHD grows, funding for ADHD services dwindles. Some GP’s, due to funding shortages, are reluctant to refer us to services.  In truth, not all of the ADHD services have enough funding to meet the NICE Guidelines. It’s even been suggested, in one known circumstance, that the Guidelines be disregarded. A couple of services have surreptitiously tried to close. Some have decided not to publicise their contact details for fear they’ll get more referrals than allowed for by their funding. Of course, this means that waiting lists are getting longer and longer; even up to 2 years long! It’s true that gate keepers and sign posters cheerily point us to psychological therapies suggesting we use them while waiting. But guess what? Yep that’s right! We’re shuffled onto the end of another waiting list where some of us must try not to listen to whispers about the low quality of the offerings. So, there we are, stuck waiting, struggling to cope with abysmally low self-esteem, hurting, lonely, barely surviving. What does this matter when it’s said that ADHD makes us resilient, that we’re used to hard knocks, that we’re survivors?  It matters because we understand too well that surviving is not thriving and that knowledge is painful!

And what about those of us who’ve been diagnosed and are taking medication? We’re all thriving right? Well not exactly. Medication is indeed all that some of us need. We can now concentrate as well as focus better. That helps us to, at last, move on and up. It helps us to feel relief as well as feel the joy of achievement. Some of us can even choose between seeing a consultant privately for follow-ups or waiting months to see the same consultant on the NHS. There’s a group of us too who, after a competent diagnosis of ADHD, don’t need any further help, not even medication. It’s enough that somebody listened, took us seriously, evaluated patterns underlying our difficulties, and found a way to help us understand. That’s all we needed to find our own way, to thrive and flourish.

Some of us, though, have been so pressured and battered by an uncomprehending and stigmatising life that the clarity that comes with medication also carries the aching revelation that our graceful childhood spirits have turned into cut-down and subjugated ghosts. Taking the right medication is not all we need.  Before we can move from surviving to thriving we need help, we need to rediscover our true spirits, our real potential.   Yet we’re stuck in the low income, or underemployed, or unemployed bracket. So we ask the NHS for help, get sign posted to psychological therapies, by the same cheery folk our clan members encountered, and off we shuffle to join the end of a waiting list.   There we are waiting, masks firmly in place (we don’t want pity), acting as if we don’t care but feeling worn-out, inside crying, mourning for our lost and trusting childhood.  We’re surviving and that’s all!

Still, at least the mere fact that we’re waiting allows us a bit more hope than those of us who’ve not been noticed. Some of us in this group are being shuffled from one wrong diagnosis to another wrong diagnosis, from one wrong medicine to another wrong medicine.  Never having our true reality heard or acknowledged. Some of us become disheartened, lose faith and sink into helplessness. And then what about those of us who learn to believe from early on that we are seemingly born to live life as a failure, never understanding why that appears to be our fate? All of us too are barely surviving!

It’s such a waste because every single one of us with ADHD has the potential to flourish. We would love to use our strengths and abilities to help others, to be a benefit. We don’t need much.  Just the right attention and the right support at the right time. Actually you know what? That’s not hard to provide!

Now I’m angry again so I’m jumping right off the fence and pointing my finger squarely at you, the Government. I’m pointing at you, Theresa May, as well as at you, Jeremy Hunt.  If you get back in charge, for goodness sake stop with your wasteful changing, privatising and building inequality into the health service. Instead, if you really care about helping people to thrive, helping the country to prosper (you do, don’t you?), stand back and for once look at the big picture.

The prevalence rate for children with ADHD is between 5 to 7%, of whom approximately 65% will continue to experience symptoms in adulthood. In other words, roughly 3% to 4% of all adults have ADHD. To make it clearer, about 1 in 25 adults have ADHD. That’s a lot of us! That’s a lot of us costing you a lot of money!

Leaving us unrecognised, undiagnosed, untreated or treated ineffectively, or pushing us onto waiting lists is costing you, the Government, a lot of money in lost tax revenue, inappropriate treatments, repeat visits to A&E, clearing up after our accidents, looking after our brothers and sisters in prisons, and so on and so on (you want evidence, ask and we’ll give it freely). It’s cheaper, far cheaper, to increase NHS mental health funding so that all of us can receive proper help! We want to use our strengths, abilities and skills.  We can use them to thrive and flourish!

And here’s a final note, the need for mental health awareness and funding did not disappear with the end of Mental Health Awareness Week.  The two thirds of people living in England, Scotland and Wales who’ve experienced mental health problems, including all of us with ADHD, are still here on Monday morning. Funding and treatment for everybody experiencing mental ill health is still needed and is still vital. With that, and with preventative care, all of us will thrive and flourish and so too will the country.

I’ve had my say for now! It’s time for you, the Government (whichever of you ends up in charge) to listen and act!

ADHD & Mind Wandering Research

UK Adult ADHD Network (UKAAN) is currently investigating the role of excessive/uncontrolled mind wandering in ADHD. As part of this research they are conducting a survey on mind wandering, ADHD and the links to educational and occupational outcomes, including both potential impairments and benefits (such as creativity) that might be linked to mind wandering in ADHD.

They have already collected a large sample of around 1,000 non-ADHD controls. Now they wish to compare this to findings from patients who have been diagnosed with ADHD. They are therefore looking for clinicians working in adult ADHD clinics to help them by handing out information sheets to patients with ADHD which invites them to take part in this research by completing the online survey.

If you are willing to assist in this research please contact Professor Philip Asherson by email (philip.asherson@kcl.ac.uk). They would like your name, work address and name of your NHS Trust, or if in a private clinics, just the address of the clinic, to add your site to the current ethics for this work.

If you wish for further information please contact Professor Philip Asherson. He can then send you a copy of their recent publication on this topic, and a rating scale that can be used to measured excessive mind wandering in adults with ADHD.

Research Project at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London

The Departments of Child Psychiatry and Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King’s College London, are looking for right-handed male volunteers with ADHD between 18-35 years of age to participate in a research project.

The project is studying areas that may cause difficulties for some people with ADHD, such as attention, timing and decision-making. This is not a treatment trial and participation in this project won’t help you directly. However, they hope that this project will help them better understand these difficulties and develop ways of helping people with ADHD who may have problems in some of these areas. For further details please UKAAN here: https://www.ukaan.org/research-by-ukaan-members.htm

If you have any questions, please contact Dr Clodagh Murphy at the IoPPN: clodagh.m.murphy@kcl.ac.uk,

or call 0207 848 0984.

BBC Horizon Documentary

BBC Horizon is making a documentary exploring ADHD. There will be two strands to the documentary and so they are looking for two groups of contributors with experiences with ADHD as follows:

Call out #1

 “Does your child have ADHD?

 BBC Horizon is making a documentary exploring ADHD, aiming to create a wider public understanding of the condition. Presented by Rory Bremner, a comedian with a particular interest in ADHD, the BBC is hoping to shed light on this commonly misunderstood condition.

 The BBC wants to meet parents of children with ADHD who can tell them about what life’s like; and to also hear from their child about their own experience of the condition. 

If you’re interested, please get in touch with Zoe on zoe.huntergordon@bbc.co.uk, just for a chat in the first instance.  The BBC will be very pleased to hear your story. 

  Call out #2

 “Do you have ADHD? Do you feel it has it impacted your life?

 BBC Horizon is making a documentary exploring ADHD, looking at the variety of ways that mild to severe ADHD can impact people’s lives in both a negative and or even positive way: with the aim of to increasing public understanding of this condition. It will be presented by Rory Bremner, a comedian who has first-hand experience of the condition.  For a specific item of the programme, we want to hear from people with ADHD who feel their condition might have contributed to them entering the criminal justice system.

Please do get in touch if you think this is you. In the first instance, it would just be a chat on the phone – you do not need to commit to anything upfront.

The BBC appreciates the sensitive nature of the subject, and will handle all calls with the utmost confidentiality and respect.

 The BBC is interested by the fact that ADHD is overrepresented in the prison population, and are interested in speaking with people who feel as though their ADHD may have contributed to their criminal behaviour.  They hope that by sharing your story, the BBC can help to shed light on this commonly misunderstood disorder.

If you’re interested, please get in touch with Zoe on zoe.huntergordon@bbc.co.uk: just for a chat in the first instance.”

 

UKAAN Conference: ADHD in the Mainstream

The UK Adult ADHD Network (UKAAN) will host its 6th Congress from Wed 20th to Fri 22nd September 2017. This 3 day conference will take place at the Mermaid Conference and Events Centre, which will accommodate up to 600 delegates in a Theatre. The venue is situated between the City and the West End, on the North Bank of the Thames, and enjoys spectacular views towards the Tate Modern, Globe Theatre and the Millennium Bridge.

The conference is titled ‘ADHD in the mainstream’ to reflect the rapid increase in recognition and treatment of ADHD by adult mental health services. ADHD is a common disorder effecting around 5% of children and 3% of adults, with symptoms and impairments that overlap with other common mental health disorders. The role that ADHD plays in the health of many adults presenting with mental health problems is now much more widely recognised, yet recent evidence suggests that in many cases the disorder still goes unrecognised or treated. Our vision is to bring ADHD into the mainstream, so that all mental health professionals have the knowledge and understanding to diagnose and treat ADHD, in the same way as other common mental health disorders.

This meeting aims to raise the level of awareness, knowledge and expertise among health care professionals about people with ADHD and provide a better understanding of the persistence of the disorder, the development of comorbid mental health problems and the delivery of effective treatments.

The program will be delivered by prominent opinion leaders, clinical experts and internationally recognised investigators and is designed to cover key topics relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD from adolescence to early and late adulthood. The selection of speakers is particularly important so that the audience can hear directly from the most experienced professionals working in this rapidly developing area of clinical psychiatry.

Registration is now open on the UKAAN Website http://www.ukaan.org/adhd-in-the-mainstream/

 

Online Survey on Mind Wandering

This is an online survey investigating if mind wandering can lead to differences in our education, occupation, and creativity. Everyone’s mind wanders, but we all do it to a different degree, so what is its impact? For some it may be useful and lead to creativity or working in a certain profession. For others it may have a negative effect, perhaps by making it difficult to learn at school. Severe mind wandering that just won’t seem to stop could also be associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). By exploring the relationship between these things researchers can better understand the impact of mind wandering and the extent to which it affects peoples’ lives.

This project is being organised by researchers at the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at King’s College London.

Before you decide if you would like to take part, it is important that you understand why the researchers are conducting this research and what your participation will involve. Please read this information sheet carefully and discuss it with others if you wish. Also, please ask the researchers if anything is unclear or you would like further information. Contact details can be found on the Information Sheet here https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0s7RDt2l670bVBfNFEzSVRqbGc/view

What participating involves
You must be aged 16 or over to participate. You will be asked to complete the online survey, which takes around 10 – 15 minutes. You do not have to complete it in one session; you can save your responses and return to it at a later time (but it must be within 1 week of starting the survey). You will be asked questions about your education, occupation, health, behaviour, and personality. By participating you can contribute to research that can further our understanding of the implications of mind wandering.

Participation is entirely voluntary. You should only participate if you want to; choosing not to will not disadvantage you in any way. If you decide to take part you can still withdraw from the study at any point without giving a reason, up until the point of data analyses. Selecting the relevant boxes in the electronic consent form indicates your consent to participate in this research, and for all submitted data to be used. This includes submission of partially completed surveys, whereby pressing the ‘next’ or ‘continue’ button indicates your consent for data entered up to that point to be included in the study.

There will also be a chance to be entered into a prize draw to win one of five £50 Amazon vouchers when you complete the survey.

Confidentiality
The Survey is hosted by Qualtrics (www.qualtrics.com), a survey platform that treats all data as highly confidential. The data does not belong to them and they do not know what data is being collected. They use best industry practices to keep data safe and their servers are protected by high-end firewall systems. Any information you provide in this study will be kept strictly confidential, and any personal details you provide will be kept separate from your survey responses ensuring anonymity. You will be provided with a unique identification number which will be used for all your data stored on our database. Information will be handled in accordance with the UK Data Protection Act 1998. During analyses individual data will not be identifiable.

Study findings
Results arising from this study will be included in a PhD thesis and presented at international academic conferences and published in academic journals. The researchers may also disseminate research findings through media outlets, including social media sites (e.g. Facebook, Twitter).

Questions and queries
If you have any questions or require more information about this study, please contact the researcher. Contact details are on the information sheet.

To complete the survey, please use the following link:

https://kcliop.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bl4sG8MsbQQt7Mh

 

The CATCh-uS ADHD Survey is now live

Please help us with a study from the University of Exeter. The project is about children and young people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in transition between children’s services and adult services.

One piece of the project, however,  is a mapping survey designed to find out which adult ADHD services are out there for young people with ADHD aged 18 and over to transition into from children’s services. This means that this survey can be answered by any person of any age who has knowledge of ADHD services, whether they have ADHD themselves or not and whether they are a parent/carer or not.

If you click on this link https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CATCh-uS_SU you will be guided to a page where you can tell the researchers about adult ADHD services in your area – or equally important the lack of adult services. The online questionnaire asks no more than 8 questions and should take less than 5 minutes to complete.

The survey is anonymous and your response will contribute to the creation of a map detailing adult ADHD services currently available in the UK. If you want more information about the project, the research team have a website where you can find more information: http://medicine.exeter.ac.uk/catchus/mapping/

Thank you very much for helping us with this project.

 

 

Updating our website

We are currently updating our website and so far we have added new information to 3 of our Library pages, namely ADHD in the NewsResearch Articles, and Books. And we have also added new ADHD events to our Calendar.

And at long last we are in the process of adding new names, and updating contact details, on our lists of Psychiatrists, Psychologists/Counsellors, Occupational Therapists (a brand new list so we’ve only got one name at the moment), Coaches, and Support Groups.   So if you would like to have your services added to our lists,  or to have your details updated, you will find how to contact us on the relevant page. There is no charge for adding your details to our website because we are managing and maintaining this website as a free resource for the ADHD community.

When we have completed our lists of Help & Support, we will be updating and adding new information to the remainder of our pages so please bear with us.

And in the meantime please feel free  to join us in our support forum where you can ask questions and chat with others about all ADHD matters.

Complaint to Chief Whip re Mr Graham Allen MP & ADHD ‘not a real disease’

Update on 2nd May 2014: to email sent to the Opposition Chief Whip regarding Graham Allen MP and his guest Dr Bruce Perry of “ADHD not a real disease” infamy.

I have not yet had a reply to the letter below which I sent on Tuesday, 8th April 2014 despite the fact that I was told by a member of Rosie Winterton’s staff that we would get a reply within two weeks.

I was polite and gave them three weeks to allow for the Easter week, and then rang Rosie Winterton’s office yesterday morning (Thursday, 1 May 2014) at 9:15 am.  An equally polite chap answered the phone, he recognised the name of AADD-UK and he knew about our complaint.  He explained that the Special Advisors (Spads) were “looking at it” and would get back to us. I asked which Spad in particular is “looking at” the complaint, and if he had any idea when the Spad would get back to us.  The polite chappie said he didn’t know when we would get an answer because he’s just the civil servant, but he did give me the name of the Spad, Luke Sullivan. The civil servant also told me that he’d again put our complaint in front of Luke Sullivan.

Fingers crossed this is more promising than it sounds! Somehow the “Thick of It” popped into my mind during this conversation.

Just as a BTW I see that Luke Sullivan was a Spad in the Chief Whip’s office when Gordon Brown was Prime Minister (2009) which surprised me because I thought Spads got sacked when their bosses left. The document I looked at also gave his pay scale which wasn’t bad, not bad at all considering that he was only in pay band 2 which was near the bottom.

And just in case you are wondering who Rosie Winterton is, well she was Labour’s pension minister when The Telegraph wrote about her on 29th May 2009 in relation to the expenses scandal.  And if you read the article (click here) you will see that her salary wasn’t bad, not bad at all, and much, much better than Luke’s.

Now I’m going to confess to you that before  I rang Rosie Winterton’s office I had an ADHD moment and by mistake I rang the office of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards (that’s the office that found Maria Miller MP guilty of claiming £45,000 in expenses to which she wasn’t entitled, and was then subsequently overruled by a committee of MP’s–beg their pardons there were three lay members on the committee except of course they weren’t allowed to vote).

After we’d sorted out that I wasn’t talking to the person I thought I was, we had a nice chat about how members of the public can hold MP’s accountable for their conduct (after I’d explained that we’d  already written to Ed Miliband,  Harriet Harman, Rosie Winterton, and of course Mr Graham Allen himself and were still waiting to hear from any of them) and as a result of our little chat I’ve now learnt that as members of the public we’ve got 3 options namely vote next year (duh!!), get legal advice (expensive waste of money when we already know Graham Allen is wrong,) or go to the media (aha!).

So there we are for the moment; waiting to hear something (hopefully more than nothing)from Mr Luke Sullivan, SpAd to Opposition Chief Whip, Rosie Winterton MP Labour.  We’ll keep you updated!

Further Update: 2nd May 2014 p.m.

And now we read in the Closer that Katie Hopkins (the former apprentice that Sir Alan Sugar called unemployable) has made it her mission to attack mothers of children with ADHD.  Even worse according to today’s  article in the Closer, Katie Hopkins was “inspired into ‘badmouthing’ ADHD children by Dr Bruce Perry” and what’s more the remainder of the article contains several unhelpful remarks about ADHD that were made by Katie’s ‘hero’ on the eve of his visit to the UK.  Dr Perry was invited to the UK by Graham Allen MP. So thank you very much Mr Allen for encouraging the likes of Katie Hopkins!

Tuesday, 8th April 2014

The following email has been sent from AADD-UK to the Opposition Chief Whip:

Right Honourable Ms Rosie Winterton, Opposition Chief Whip 

I am writing on behalf of Adult Attention Deficit Disorder – UK (AADD-UK) to make a complaint about Mr Graham Allen. We have tried to resolve the matter directly with Mr Allen but he has not responded.

 

Mr Allen has endorsed an article that appeared in the Observer on Sunday, 30th March 2014 titled “ADHD ‘not a real disease’ says US neuroscientist.” Mr Allen has placed a photograph of this article (30th March) on his official Twitter account (@GrahamAllenMP) along with the caption “Dr Bruce Perry, my Early Intervention hero, in UK today, want to attend his EIF events over next 2 days?”

 

In addition, Mr Allen also has placed a photograph on Twitter (1st April) which is captioned “Dr Bruce Perry speaks to Labour shadow ministers this morning”, this photograph and caption gives the appearance that Dr Perry’s views could potentially also be the Labour Party’s views (I have attached copies of Mr Allen’s Tweets).

 

We feel that Mr Allen is potentially in breach of the Code of Conduct for Members of Parliament namely:

 

1. Members have a duty to uphold the law, including the general law against discrimination.

 

We feel that it is harassment for a public figure, an MP, to invite and host a doctor who in the past has spoken against ADHD, and then to publicly approve his guest’s stigmatising opinion made on the eve of his visit to the UK that ADHD is not real. It is harassment not only because ADHD is a recognised disability that meets the requirements for a protected characteristic under the Equality Act 2010, but also because people with ADHD in the UK already had significant problems with daily living intensified by shame generated from home-grown discriminatory comments and behaviour.  We did not, therefore, need Members of Parliament validating such derogatory opinions and thus causing us further humiliation and distress.

 

2. Members have a general duty to act in the interests of the nation as a whole; and a special duty to their constituents.

 

Given that the prevalence rate for ADHD in the UK is between 2-5%, it is more than likely that Mr Allen has constituents with ADHD.  His inviting and hosting a guest such as Dr Perry who openly speaks his mind about ADHD, followed by Mr Allen’s public endorsement of Dr Perry’s views makes it nearly impossible for Mr Allen’s constituents who  either have ADHD themselves, or care for someone with ADHD, or have a friend or relation with ADHD to contact him and ask him to represent their interests and concerns in the House of Commons.  It also means that they are excluded from political activities for as long as Mr Allen remains their MP.

 

The National Institute of Clinical Excellence, in 2008, completed a full review of the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD across the lifespan and published guidelines in September 2008.  These guidelines did help to stimulate the development of service provision for ADHD in the UK.  But ADHD services, particularly for adults, are still too scarce in the UK.  This is of relevance for children and young people because as they transition from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services there are frequently no adult services available in their area.  And unfortunately austerity measures have meant that many mental health services have been cut, and sometimes waiting lists for ADHD services can be as long as 18 months!  Indeed sometimes the barriers are so high that people with ADHD have resorted to asking their MP’s for help accessing services. This makes it all the more disappointing that Mr Allen presents himself as endorsing the view that ADHD is not real, because this means that people will be deterred from going to their MP’s for help, not just for ADHD matters but for any reason.

 

Mr Allen is not setting a good example and this is not good for the nation because the proportion of people receiving treatment for ADHD in the UK is lower than the prevalence rate and failure to treat ADHD is costly to society. There is plenty of evidence to show that untreated ADHD leads to increased rates of unemployment, addictions, criminal convictions, and poor social adjustments.  I have included links to relevant documents at the end of this email.

 

In addition, when Mr Allen endorsed Dr Perry’s opinions in a Tweet and followed this up with a Tweet accompanied by a photograph of Labour Shadow Ministers listening to Dr Perry, and a photograph of Dr Perry with Francis Maude the perception was created that it could be Labour policy as well as Coalition Government Policy to discount ADHD as a valid disorder. That’s a deterrent that would inhibit the rest of us from also engaging with the entire political process.

 

3. Members should act on all occasions in accordance with the public trust placed in them. They should always behave with probity and integrity, including in their use of public resources.

 

Dr Perry would possibly not have had a chance to express his opinions in the UK media if he had not been invited to come and meet Government ministers by Mr Allen.  But he was invited here, and his opinions have been endorsed and validated by Mr Allen, not just  by the publication of the photograph that we described  earlier, but by the fact that Mr Allen helped Dr Perry meet with Government officials including Iain Duncan Smith, Jeremy Hunt, and Francis Maude (see attached photograph) and also with Labour Shadow Ministers.  This creates the further perception, rightly or wrongly, that taxpayer money is being used to help promote anti-ADHD views, as well as to pay for the time of ministers and others who met with Dr Perry, who sat and listened to his presentations, and who in at least one case was photographed with him.   

 

4. “Members shall base their conduct on a consideration of the public interest, avoid conflict between personal interest and the public interest and resolve any conflict between the two, at once, and in favour of the public interest.” (V, 10)

 

We most definitely feel that Mr Allen has confused and mixed his personal interests and opinions with public interests regarding his work in early intervention, his reports about early intervention, as well as his creation of the Early Intervention Foundation.   We are concerned that Mr Allen invited, hosted, and endorsed Dr Perry who on the eve of his visit to the UK to meet with Government ministers on behalf of Early Intervention expressed to a major newspaper the biased and inflammatory opinion that ADHD is not real because that makes us wonder how Mr Allen’s Early Intervention Foundation will be able to provide “practical advice and support to those trying to make Early Intervention a reality on the ground” when at the core there appears to be a complete lack of knowledge and acceptance that a common neurological disorder affecting behaviour and attention is indeed real.

 

To resolve this conflict in favour of public interest we feel that ADHD should always be a consideration in anything relating to early intervention whether it be of Mr Allen’s design or that of others, and we would like written assurance regarding that. We should also like Mr Allen to withdraw all photographs and references relating to Dr Perry from his Tweets and that includes the photograph of the Observer article. And finally we would like a letter of apology from Mr Allen which we will publish.

 

At the bottom of this email is a sampling of some of the articles that appeared in the traditional press repeating response to Dr Perry’s opinions (Dr Perry was also widely quoted in many other news sources, various blogs, forums, Facebook, and Twitter), as well as a sampling of information about ADHD.

 

I look forward to hearing from you.

Dr Bruce Perry: ADHD is “not a real disease”

AADD-UK has sent the following email to Graham Allen MP with copies to Ed Miliband, Harriet Harman, & Andy Burnham:

Dear Mr Allen,

I am very sorry to say this but one of your tweets (at 12:46 p.m. on Sunday, 30 Mar 2014)  has caused considerable offence. It is a photograph of a newspaper article entitled “ADHD ‘not a real disease’ says US neuroscientist” and above it you have placed the following caption: “Dr Bruce Perry, my Early Intervention hero, in UK today . . .”.  

I have attached a copy of your tweet. 

The offence caused by the photograph is made worse by your use of the word “hero” to describe Dr Perry.  

Also, I don’t know if Dr Perry was misquoted in the Observer, but if he wasn’t it was not helpful for your guest to make such statements about ADHD (an area in which he does not have specialised knowledge) on the eve of his visit to the UK.  His remarks, as stated in The Observer, were very widely publicised in many reputable and otherwise newspapers, blogs, and forums. And all this at a time when people with ADHD are already struggling to overcome considerable stigma and discrimination as well as struggling to access much needed help so that they can live fulfilled lives. The firestorm of adverse publicity increased the distress and anxiety of many people with ADHD. 

Would you please consider taking down the offending tweet and offering an apology to people with ADHD. I appreciate that you are trying to do your best for children through the Early Intervention Foundation, but since mental health services (and other much needed services) have been badly affected by the coalition government’s cuts, we all, adults included, need at least some politicians that we feel will listen. 

I look forward to hearing from you.

So now we are waiting to see if they are listening! We’ll keep you updated!

ADHD – Mind, Brain and Body

The UK Adult ADHD Network (UKAAN) will host its 4th Congress in September 2014, entitled ADHD – Mind, Brain and Body, in conjunction with ENAA and APSARD. The conference will take place over 3 days, at the Mermaid Conference and Events Centre which is situated between the City and the West End in London. Located on the North Bank of the Thames, it enjoys spectacular views towards the Tate Modern, the Globe theatre and the Millennium Bridge. The theatre will accommodate 600 people, and there will also be opportunities to attend parallel sessions throughout the event.

The conference will bring together internationally recognised experts in the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD across the lifespan and highlight basic science and clinical research that contributes to our current understanding of ADHD as a lifespan disorder. Clinical services for ADHD during the transition years from adolescence to adulthood and for those newly diagnosed as adults are developing rapidly throughout many parts of Europe. The conference will build on this growing expertise by providing a uniquely European perspective that highlights the full range of functional, cognitive and mental health impairments, the impact that ADHD has on adolescent and adult mental health and the contribution to adolescent and adult psychopathology. This meeting will address important clinical and scientific questions relating to ADHD and will be relevant to anyone interested in the mental health of people from the adolescent years through to early, middle and later adult life.

This meeting aims to raise the level of awareness and knowledge among health care professionals about people with ADHD as they grow older; and to provide a better understanding of the causal pathways involved in the persistence of the disorder and the development of important clinical comorbidities. The program will be delivered by prominent opinion leaders, clinical experts and internationally recognised investigators and is designed to cover key topics relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD during the critical period from adolescence to adulthood. The selection of speakers is particular important so that the audience can hear directly from the most experienced professionals working in this rapidly developing area of clinical psychiatry.

The UK Adult ADHD Network (UKAAN) was established in March 2009 to provide support, education, research and training for mental health professionals working with adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). UKAAN was founded by a group of experienced mental health specialists who run clinical services for adults with ADHD within the National Health Service.

More information about the 4th Congress, and registration details are available on UKAAN’s website here.

UKAP – Reducing the costs of ADHD Across Education, Health and Care

UKAP (the UK ADHD Partnership) will host its first conference on Friday 4th April 2014. This one day event will take place at the Thistle Charing Cross Hotel, London, with a conference on ‘Reducing the Costs of ADHD across Education, Health and Care’ .

The aim of the meeting is to introduce, education, healthcare and allied professionals to the UKAP committee’s objective to raise the profile of ADHD on the political agenda in order that young people with ADHD gain better recognition and access to treatment across educational, occupational, youth justice and healthcare settings.

UKAP would also like to invite parents, carers other voluntary sector organisations and support groups who are working to support ADHD, to join them in their call to action which seeks to inform policy makers and authorities of the importance of early identification and intervention.

With presentations on the costs of ADHD, the impact on education, the family, the youth justice system, health service, accidental injury and driving, UKAP will consider what can be done to reduce the burden of ADHD on children, the family and more broadly in society.  The programme will include presentations by prominent opinion leaders, and internationally recognised clinical and educational practitioners.

This meeting will be relevant to all education and healthcare practitioners working with children and young people, together with allied professionals involved in multi-agency working including educational, occupational and youth justice settings, as well as commissioners and policy makers.

For more information and registration details see the UKAP website here.

Anyone else got info on courses?

On line course on ADHD:

https://www.coursera.org/course/adhd

Reviews, thoughts, or details of other courses gratefully received.

Close to an Act: how did the Health and Social Care Bill get passed?

AADD-UK has received permission from Mike Birtwistle, Head of MHP Health, to reproduce his analysis as to how the Health and Social Care Bill is now set to become an Act, barring any last-minute dramatic revelations. We asked for Mike’s permission because his analysis helps us to understand how these reforms might impact our access to assessments, diagnosis, and treatment for ADHD, and also helps us to figure out how we can address impacts resulting from these reforms.

Close to an Act: how did the Health and Social Care Bill get passed?

Submitted by Mike Birtwistle on 20-03-2012

It’s all over, bar some (more) shouting. The Health and Social Care Bill is nearly law but, after hundreds of hours of debate, thousands of amendments and countless controversies, what will it actually mean? And how on earth did it ever get passed?

Theoretically the Queen could decline to give Royal Assent to the Bill, as Unite suggested last week. However, barring any constitutional outrages or last minute shocks in the Commons, it will become an Act. And the Health and Social Care Act will represent one of the longest and most complex items of health legislation ever known. That it passed through a hung Parliament, in the teeth of such controversy is no small feat.

For better or worse, the Act will represent one of the most profound pieces of reforming legislation ever (alongside the Attlee reforms of the 1940s and some of the market reforms of the last Conservative Government). I believe all three sets of reforms have problems, but the scope of their impact and ambition is undeniable. Continue reading

ADHD: Transition from Adolescence to Adulthood

The UK Adult ADHD Network (UKAAN) will hold the 3rd Congress on the 29th June 2012. The theme will be ‘Transition of ADHD from Adolescence to Adulthood’. The conference will be located in Central London at Savoy Place, 2 Savoy Place, City of London WC2R 0BL

The congress aims to bring important topics on transition in ADHD to a wider audience. The scientific program will include five main sessions, with a panel and audience discussion

Clinical services for ADHD during the transition years from adolescence to adulthood and for those newly diagnosed as adults are developing rapidly. This meeting will address important clinical and scientific questions relating to ADHD and will be relevant to anyone interested in the mental health of people from the adolescent years through to early, middle and later adult life.

For more information and registration details for this important conference please go to the UKAAN website.

Get Involved in a New Government Disability Strategy

Brighton Adult ADHD Group has been invited to contribute directly to a new cross-government disability strategy. The Government has published a discussion document with questions and Brighton Adult ADHD Group wants to gather your views, to make sure we represent the experiences of people with ADHD in Sussex.

To share your views please come to our discussion event. We will have a speaker from the Office for Disability Issues.

Date:  Wednesday 7th March

Time:  18.30 – 20.00

Location: The Brunswick Room, The Brighthelm Centre, North Road, Brighton, BN1 1YD

Light refreshments will be provided

For further information please contact Caroline Williams on 01403 733931

We want to talk about practical ideas that will make a real difference to your life. The Government has asked us to focus on three areas:

  • realising aspirations
  • increasing individual control
  • changing attitudes and behaviours

We have made a questionnaire with questions relating to each area that can be downloaded here. It would be helpful if you could fill in your responses before coming to the meeting, and bring them with you. If you are unable to attend the meeting, please email your responses as soon as possible to mail@adhdbrighton.org.uk

We will send a report of our event to the Government. They will look at everyone’s suggestions and work with disabled people to publish a new strategy later this year.

If you want to find out more visit www.odi.gov.uk/fulfillingpotential

Update:Cambridgeshire’s denial of NHS treatment for adults newly diagnosed with ADHD

AADD-UK has not yet received an official response to our letter (see previous post on this subject) regarding the actions taken by NHS Trusts and Commissioning Groups in Cambridgeshire which restrict access to NICE recommended treatments for people who are diagnosed as adults with ADHD.  However, we notice that the new low priority policy for ADHD has been removed from the website for the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Public Health Network and has been replaced by the words “Please note this policy has been temporarily withdrawn.” You can read this for yourself here.

Now we do realise that this removal could just be coincidence, and may or may not be a good sign.  But Cambridgeshire County Council, who also received a copy of our letter, has made a very positive move.  The Council’s “Adults Wellbeing and Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee” has listed under Agenda Item 7a (for their meeting on 8 February 2012) in “Committee priorities and work programme 2011/12” the following: “Provision of medication for adults with ADHD: The Chairman has received representations from individuals with ADHD on this issue.  It is proposed that the Chairman and Vice-Chairman, with the support of the Scrutiny and Improvement Officer, follows this up with NHS Cambridgeshire.”

Well done and a big AADD-UK Thank You to Councillor Kevin Reynold, the Chairman of the Committee!

The meeting of the Adults Wellbeing and Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee is open to the public so if you live in Cambridgeshire and have been affected by the low priority policy do please go to the meeting. The meeting is on Wednesday 8 February 2012 at 2:30 PM in the Kreis Viersen Room, Shire Hall, Cambridge.  More details are available on their website here.

And again, Thank You Councillor Reynold!

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